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zoomwitch:

number-one-mollusc-fan:

snerky:

incredible

holy shit

look at this

There are accepted revolutions, revolutions which are called revolutions; there are refused revolutions, which are called riots.

Les Miserables Volume 5, Book 1, Chapter 20 (via rrosejonathanselavy)

You mean, like Ferguson?

(via saucefactory)
How can I tell,” said the man, “that the past isn’t a fiction designed to account for the discrepancy between my immediate physical sensations and my state of mind?
Douglas Adam, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (via whyallcaps)

ボトムス:JieDaシューズ:Prada

ボトムス:JieDa
シューズ:
Prada

choes:

Virginia, 2007

perfect.

zodiacsociety:

The first word you see is your other-half’s zodiac sign!It’s the one you are subconsciously attracted to the most.Which zodiac sign did you see first?


I saw Capricorn.This is a place.

zodiacsociety:

The first word you see is your other-half’s zodiac sign!
It’s the one you are subconsciously attracted to the most.
Which zodiac sign did you see first?

I saw Capricorn.




This is a place.

I’m a collector of great covers.

starsofsagittarius:

irreducibilitas:

Grimm and Other Folk Tales

by Cory Godbey

 your recent post made me think of this.@oak

Now, if an animal is captured and it wakes up in a cage, its biological impulse is to run. Humans, because of our incredibly complex brains, can actually shut that off and thus thwart the discharge process. Our need for safety is compromised by the neocortex’s control over our instinctive behavior. One reason it is so hard for us to achieve this desperately needed discharge is that in the context of industrial civilization, what we think of as safety has very little to do with what our evolution expects for safety. So we accumulate traumatic stress and hold it in our bodies. And, in fact, the exact same thwarting of the discharge process can be seen in captive animals. We are, in a very real way, like the tiger pacing in its cage.
Entropy (via ninjabikeslut)